Don't hate on millennials for selling out. Start forgiving their student loan debts

"Since 1980, the average price of a four-year college has shot up from $8,756 to $21,657, dramatically outpacing inflation. This means more and more people are borrowing money to pay for it. In 2013, the average student was almost $30,000 in the hole after graduation. Total student debt has nearly quadrupled in the last decade alone and recently surpassed $1tn in total, most of it held by individuals from low-income families. Combine these facts with dreadful employment options and stagnating wages, and it’s no wonder 20% of borrowers will be delinquent within their first five years of paybacks. Many more will barely tread water, covering only the accrued interest month after month, even as the years wear on."

[…]

"Let the price of higher education rise every year, and there will be fewer artists and activists – and more folks aiming for middle management.

"Some will ignore these changing conditions, preferring instead to wag their fingers and lament that ‘millennials’ just don’t care about the state of society. And while we’re preoccupied criticizing one another, the creditor class will be laughing all the way to the bank."

Stanley Kubrick: “Untitled (I Hate Love), 1950”

Stanley Kubrick: “Untitled (I Hate Love), 1950”

TCS - Robot Heart: Heart-Shaped Box - Nirvana (covered by Kawehi)

historicaltimes:

Tattooed mother in 1939.

Arthur Rothstein: “Mother of family on relief living in shanty at city dump. Herrin, Illinois,” January 1939. (via)

historicaltimes:

Tattooed mother in 1939.

Arthur Rothstein: “Mother of family on relief living in shanty at city dump. Herrin, Illinois,” January 1939. (via)

(via blake500)

staceymariephoto:

Motherfucker @ the Caledonia Lounge, Athens GA, 02.28.14 | selenographie

I think the correct response is bees but I’ll just leave this here and hope it gets ‘shopped while I’m taking the bus home from work.

I think the correct response is bees but I’ll just leave this here and hope it gets ‘shopped while I’m taking the bus home from work.

thedailylooker:

Beach Accident, Coney Island, Brooklyn, NY, 1951
Margaret Bourke-White/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
"She is best known as the first foreign photographer permitted to take pictures of Soviet industry, the first female war correspondent (and the first woman permitted to work in combat zones) and the first female photographer for Henry Luce’s Life magazine, where her photograph appeared on the first cover."

thedailylooker:

Beach Accident, Coney Island, Brooklyn, NY, 1951

Margaret Bourke-White/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

"She is best known as the first foreign photographer permitted to take pictures of Soviet industry, the first female war correspondent (and the first woman permitted to work in combat zones) and the first female photographer for Henry Luce’s Life magazine, where her photograph appeared on the first cover."

(via lastgreatpoolparty)

(Andie MacDowell in sex, lies, and videotape, 1989)

(Andie MacDowell in sex, lies, and videotape, 1989)

(Source: the80swererad)

Wu Meng: Gravity 1, 2010

“Gravity (2010), shown at OV Gallery in Shanghai, explored the cover-ups of reports of women raped and murdered in massage parlors. Sexual double standards are as prevalent in China as elsewhere, and sex workers are often dismissed as deserving whatever violence is meted out to them. Wu Meng takes ordinary garments—underwear, T-shirts, cotton dresses—and hangs them in a range of Shanghai public spaces. Shanghai is filled with washed clothing hanging on power lines, on clotheslines slung between trees, and on racks placed on the sidewalk, so Wu Meng’s choice is a deliberately ambiguous intervention in the public sphere. Text printed on the garments is intentionally ambiguous too. One reads, ‘A rumour spread quickly/Everyone knew it, but it never went public.’ In a country in which rumor and innuendo spread like wildfire through micro-blogging, and in which people (often rightly) suspect the worst of officialdom, this is understood to refer to secrecy and a culture of cover-up and corruption.”
(via DailyServing)

Wu Meng: Gravity 1, 2010

Gravity (2010), shown at OV Gallery in Shanghai, explored the cover-ups of reports of women raped and murdered in massage parlors. Sexual double standards are as prevalent in China as elsewhere, and sex workers are often dismissed as deserving whatever violence is meted out to them. Wu Meng takes ordinary garments—underwear, T-shirts, cotton dresses—and hangs them in a range of Shanghai public spaces. Shanghai is filled with washed clothing hanging on power lines, on clotheslines slung between trees, and on racks placed on the sidewalk, so Wu Meng’s choice is a deliberately ambiguous intervention in the public sphere. Text printed on the garments is intentionally ambiguous too. One reads, ‘A rumour spread quickly/Everyone knew it, but it never went public.’ In a country in which rumor and innuendo spread like wildfire through micro-blogging, and in which people (often rightly) suspect the worst of officialdom, this is understood to refer to secrecy and a culture of cover-up and corruption.”

(via DailyServing)