"Are you sure people will recognize you in this photo? It doesn’t seem to have a face in it."
GOOD.

"Are you sure people will recognize you in this photo? It doesn’t seem to have a face in it."

GOOD.

digital probz

why did i take 230 photos of two bands last night

4 notes

fifidunks:

Photographs of “Street Style” from Hot & Cool Issue No. 5

"One standout editorial from Hot and Cool no. 5 (Spring 2013) was composed entirely of screenshots of people from Google Map’s Street View app. [Alice] Goddard had stumbled upon ‘this tiny town in America’ on Maps and thought the plainly-dressed people there looked amazing. The editorial she designed was a parody of contemporary street style photography—’the main point of difference,’ she says, ‘being that people who are photographed by street style photographers are generally people who have made a huge effort with their clothing, and the resulting images often feel a bit over fussed and over precious—the subject is completely aware of the outcome; whereas the people we were finding on Google Maps obviously had no idea they were being photographed, and yet their outfits were, to me, more interesting.’”

via “Normcore: Fashion for Those Who Realize They’re One in 7 Billion" (Fiona Duncan, NYMag)

scumblebee:

If you’re wondering what a religious experience feels like it’s v similar to being in a dark arena and sensing light all around you, and you look up and see thousands of teenagers waving their iPhone flashlights in unison

scumblebee:

If you’re wondering what a religious experience feels like it’s v similar to being in a dark arena and sensing light all around you, and you look up and see thousands of teenagers waving their iPhone flashlights in unison

ghosts-in-the-tv:

Edwin Land, the president and co-founder of the Polaroid Corporation, demonstrates his company’s “60-second film” in 1963.

ghosts-in-the-tv:

Edwin Land, the president and co-founder of the Polaroid Corporation, demonstrates his company’s “60-second film” in 1963.

(Source: TIME, via blake500)

Pigeon photography is an aerial photography technique invented in 1907 by the German apothecary Julius Neubronner, who also used pigeons to deliver medications. A homing pigeon was fitted with an aluminium breast harness to which a lightweight time-delayed miniature camera could be attached. Neubronner’s German patent application was initially rejected, but was granted in December 1908 after he produced authenticated photographs taken by his pigeons. He publicized the technique at the 1909 Dresden International Photographic Exhibition, and sold some images as postcards at the Frankfurt International Aviation Exhibition and at the 1910 and 1911 Paris Air Shows.

(Wiki)

historicaltimes:

Photographers posing together for a group selfie on the roof of Marceau’s Studio, 5th Ave across from St. Patrick’s Cathedral, NYC, 1920 actual photo they took in the comments
WayBackPhotoArchive:


The picture they took (Edit:Looking at the hats looks like a selfie from another time although you can see St. Patrick’s Cathedral in the background)
Selfie with just Byron

Byron Company, Uncle Joe Byron, Pirie MacDonald, Colonel Marceau, Pop Core, Ben Falk-New York, 1920. Museum of the City of New York

http://mcnyblog.org/2013/02/26/the-photographers-mirror-2/
Photos from his great-grandson

historicaltimes:

Photographers posing together for a group selfie on the roof of Marceau’s Studio, 5th Ave across from St. Patrick’s Cathedral, NYC, 1920 actual photo they took in the comments

WayBackPhotoArchive:

The picture they took (Edit:Looking at the hats looks like a selfie from another time although you can see St. Patrick’s Cathedral in the background)

Selfie with just Byron

Byron Company, Uncle Joe Byron, Pirie MacDonald, Colonel Marceau, Pop Core, Ben Falk-New York, 1920. Museum of the City of New York

http://mcnyblog.org/2013/02/26/the-photographers-mirror-2/

Photos from his great-grandson

(via mmimic)

The Riverport Riot was a riot at the Riverport Amphitheater (now named Verizon Wireless Amphitheater St. Louis) in Maryland Heights, Missouri (near St. Louis) at a Guns N’ Roses concert on July 2, 1991. It is also known as the “Rocket Queen Riot.”

During the band’s performance of “Rocket Queen”, the 15th song in the set (counting drum & guitar solos), lead singer Axl Rose, in the middle of the chorus, pointed out a fan who was taking still pictures of the show, saying “…Hey, take that! Take that! Now, get that guy and take that!” When security failed to deal with the person, Rose decided to confiscate the camera himself, saying “I’ll take it, god damn it!” and then jumped into the audience and tackled the person. After taking the camera, striking members of the audience and the security team, and being pulled out of the audience by members of the crew, Rose grabs his microphone and said “Well, thanks to the lame-ass security, I’m going home!”, slammed his microphone on the ground and left the stage.

The sound the microphone made sounded to some fans like a gunshot. After Rose left, band member Slash quickly told the audience, “He just smashed the microphone. We’re out of here.” The angry crowd began to riot and dozens of people were injured. The footage was captured by Robert John, who was documenting the entire tour for the band. Rose was charged with having incited the riot, but police were unable to arrest him until almost a year later, as the band went overseas to continue the tour. Charges were filed against Rose but a judge ruled that he did not directly incite the riot.

(via Wiki)

"Media coverage of a war is a part of the war. But ‘objective,’ view-from-nowhere media outlets tend to downplay media coverage of the war in their coverage of the war. They avoid self-reference, but not out of humility: Rather, it’s out their sense of imagined objectivity. If people are reminded of the reporter who wrote the story, of the photographer who shot it, they might be jerked out of the story. Who likes to see a boom mike in the shot during a movie? A reflection of the cameraman in a mirror? These continuity ‘errors’ make it harder for us to suspend our disbelief—whether we’re looking at a fictional film or a ‘news’ photo."

Adam Weinstein, “Should the AP Really Have Fired This Pulitzer-Prize War Photographer?” (Gawker)

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