Wu Meng: Gravity 1, 2010

“Gravity (2010), shown at OV Gallery in Shanghai, explored the cover-ups of reports of women raped and murdered in massage parlors. Sexual double standards are as prevalent in China as elsewhere, and sex workers are often dismissed as deserving whatever violence is meted out to them. Wu Meng takes ordinary garments—underwear, T-shirts, cotton dresses—and hangs them in a range of Shanghai public spaces. Shanghai is filled with washed clothing hanging on power lines, on clotheslines slung between trees, and on racks placed on the sidewalk, so Wu Meng’s choice is a deliberately ambiguous intervention in the public sphere. Text printed on the garments is intentionally ambiguous too. One reads, ‘A rumour spread quickly/Everyone knew it, but it never went public.’ In a country in which rumor and innuendo spread like wildfire through micro-blogging, and in which people (often rightly) suspect the worst of officialdom, this is understood to refer to secrecy and a culture of cover-up and corruption.”
(via DailyServing)

Wu Meng: Gravity 1, 2010

Gravity (2010), shown at OV Gallery in Shanghai, explored the cover-ups of reports of women raped and murdered in massage parlors. Sexual double standards are as prevalent in China as elsewhere, and sex workers are often dismissed as deserving whatever violence is meted out to them. Wu Meng takes ordinary garments—underwear, T-shirts, cotton dresses—and hangs them in a range of Shanghai public spaces. Shanghai is filled with washed clothing hanging on power lines, on clotheslines slung between trees, and on racks placed on the sidewalk, so Wu Meng’s choice is a deliberately ambiguous intervention in the public sphere. Text printed on the garments is intentionally ambiguous too. One reads, ‘A rumour spread quickly/Everyone knew it, but it never went public.’ In a country in which rumor and innuendo spread like wildfire through micro-blogging, and in which people (often rightly) suspect the worst of officialdom, this is understood to refer to secrecy and a culture of cover-up and corruption.”

(via DailyServing)

Love’s Shadow (detail) vs Proud Maisie (detail) by Frederick Sandys (1829-1904)

oil on panel, 1867 and pencil and crayon on paper, 1868

(Source: paintingses, via confuoco)

taktophoto:

red hong yi renders chinese scenes from makeup

(Source: designboom.com, via coralgreef)

138,389 notes

wetheurban:

DESIGN: Submerged Turntable by Evan Holm

Artist Evan Holm is convinced that ‘there will be a time when all tracings of human culture will dissolve back into the soil under the slow crush of the unfolding universe’. 

To demonstrate these rather dark thoughts, he created a submerged record player that’s still producing a nearly perfect audio as demonstrated in the short video below.

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(via gocommandomusic)

91,593 notes

"Jenny’s Adopted Brothers" from Jenny and the Cat Club by Esther Averill (1952)

"Jenny’s Adopted Brothers" from Jenny and the Cat Club by Esther Averill (1952)

"Jenny’s Adopted Brothers" from Jenny and the Cat Club by Esther Averill (1952)

"Jenny’s Adopted Brothers" from Jenny and the Cat Club by Esther Averill (1952)

Céleste Boursier-Mougenot