Meanwhile, in Athens…

p: Why do they have to have a women’s night at [venue] anyway?

s: Uh, because basically every night at every venue is dudes’ night.

p: Oh. You’re right.

If I have to be the person explaining feminism 101 to a dude I prefer when the conversation goes like this.

4 notes

rustbeltjessie:

Phases of the Moon (and other zines by Stacey Marie). (Featured: Phases of the Moon #3.)
I’ve known Stacey for quite a long time now. We started trading zines and writing letters when we both did our not-so-great old zines, when we both romanticized everything and were super into the punk rocks. We’ve been IRL friends, and pen/zine/online friends, and we’ve seen each other grow as writers. But you know, I can’t help but feel that she has far surpassed me in recent years. Like, she’s getting over Punk as a Thing, and I’m still way too into it. Like, I’m still a hopeless romantic lovesick dork (to borrow a phrase she used to describe her old self), and even when she writes about the same kind of stuff I do, she seems less apt to romanticize everything. She’s a bit younger than I am, but for some reason in her writing she comes across as older, more self-possessed, and wiser than I do. All comparisons aside, her stuff is awesome and she’s an amazing photographer, too, and she’s a great person.
I owe her a letter. I owe a lot of people letters. I am actually the worst penpal ever.
(More Stacey Marie on my blog: I don’t want my 30s to be entirely consumed…)

Rust Belt Jessie wrote this amazing thing about me and I’m super flattered and have to post it for shameless self-promotion reasons.
But I also wanna disclaim that while #getting over punk is an important thing for my own ~personal development~, I know that cool punks can also exist (case in point, RBJ! You shouldn’t feel bad about being “way too into it” because you are not the jerk type of punk!). Maybe I will write about this in a future zine because I haven’t been able to articulate it very well outside of snarky text posts yet, but to try and keep it concise: I still believe that I learned some important things as a result of my involvement in punk — like DIY especially, and being punk when I was a teenager was what got me into some activism/radical thought/questioning everything. These are ideals I want to keep with me always!
But I got too disillusioned by the usual BS: punker-than-thou types calling me a poseur when I was 16 because I listened to Other Genres of Music (gasp! SECRET: I am actually really into techno sorry not sorry!), false-sense-of-entitlement drunk punks tryna get a free ride because paying rent is THE MAN (I spent too much time living in a punk house lol), false-sense-of-entitlement abusive dudebros convoluting punk theory into a massive guilt trip about my having job/degree = fake/inauthentic, false-sense-of-entitlement white anarchoprimitivists, “”“accountability processes””“, uh “”“community”“”, etc.
I know those crappy things aren’t What Punk Is About but in my experience it’s just too easy for jerks to gravitate towards this particular subculture…the bad has outweighed the good for way too long for me and I’d rather not hang out in a scene that seems to harbor a shockingly overweighted percentage of drunk abusers. (MAYBE it is different in other cities HMM). & honestly I’ve found the ex-punk community far more welcoming and supportive than I ever felt when I was very actively In The Scene (hey y’all).
Anyway I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to hijack this post so I’ll get off my soapbox and say that despite my apparent rejection of all things punk I really admire RBJ for successfully being a grown-up punk, continuing to romanticize everything in her writing which is an inspiration to me, constantly introducing me to new music, being a great mixtape-maker, being a fantastic writer, being an A+ mama, and generally being an all-around awesome person who I’m happy to have been friends with for a very long time.
(PS - Also, I’m kicking myself for having gotten a hand tattoo when I was 19. 19-year-old me thought it would be just grand to spend her entire life slinging coffee, washing dishes, or entering data in an office cave NOPE UGH WRONG.)

rustbeltjessie:

Phases of the Moon (and other zines by Stacey Marie). (Featured: Phases of the Moon #3.)

I’ve known Stacey for quite a long time now. We started trading zines and writing letters when we both did our not-so-great old zines, when we both romanticized everything and were super into the punk rocks. We’ve been IRL friends, and pen/zine/online friends, and we’ve seen each other grow as writers. But you know, I can’t help but feel that she has far surpassed me in recent years. Like, she’s getting over Punk as a Thing, and I’m still way too into it. Like, I’m still a hopeless romantic lovesick dork (to borrow a phrase she used to describe her old self), and even when she writes about the same kind of stuff I do, she seems less apt to romanticize everything. She’s a bit younger than I am, but for some reason in her writing she comes across as older, more self-possessed, and wiser than I do. All comparisons aside, her stuff is awesome and she’s an amazing photographer, too, and she’s a great person.

I owe her a letter. I owe a lot of people letters. I am actually the worst penpal ever.

(More Stacey Marie on my blog: I don’t want my 30s to be entirely consumed…)

Rust Belt Jessie wrote this amazing thing about me and I’m super flattered and have to post it for shameless self-promotion reasons.

But I also wanna disclaim that while #getting over punk is an important thing for my own ~personal development~, I know that cool punks can also exist (case in point, RBJ! You shouldn’t feel bad about being “way too into it” because you are not the jerk type of punk!). Maybe I will write about this in a future zine because I haven’t been able to articulate it very well outside of snarky text posts yet, but to try and keep it concise: I still believe that I learned some important things as a result of my involvement in punk — like DIY especially, and being punk when I was a teenager was what got me into some activism/radical thought/questioning everything. These are ideals I want to keep with me always!

But I got too disillusioned by the usual BS: punker-than-thou types calling me a poseur when I was 16 because I listened to Other Genres of Music (gasp! SECRET: I am actually really into techno sorry not sorry!), false-sense-of-entitlement drunk punks tryna get a free ride because paying rent is THE MAN (I spent too much time living in a punk house lol), false-sense-of-entitlement abusive dudebros convoluting punk theory into a massive guilt trip about my having job/degree = fake/inauthentic, false-sense-of-entitlement white anarchoprimitivists, “”“accountability processes””“, uh “”“community”“”, etc.

I know those crappy things aren’t What Punk Is About but in my experience it’s just too easy for jerks to gravitate towards this particular subculture…the bad has outweighed the good for way too long for me and I’d rather not hang out in a scene that seems to harbor a shockingly overweighted percentage of drunk abusers. (MAYBE it is different in other cities HMM). & honestly I’ve found the ex-punk community far more welcoming and supportive than I ever felt when I was very actively In The Scene (hey y’all).

Anyway I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to hijack this post so I’ll get off my soapbox and say that despite my apparent rejection of all things punk I really admire RBJ for successfully being a grown-up punk, continuing to romanticize everything in her writing which is an inspiration to me, constantly introducing me to new music, being a great mixtape-maker, being a fantastic writer, being an A+ mama, and generally being an all-around awesome person who I’m happy to have been friends with for a very long time.

(PS - Also, I’m kicking myself for having gotten a hand tattoo when I was 19. 19-year-old me thought it would be just grand to spend her entire life slinging coffee, washing dishes, or entering data in an office cave NOPE UGH WRONG.)

I apologize in advance to my friends who hate Doctor Who but this face is my reaction to life & also I just CANNOT with this Buzzcocks, ugh.

I apologize in advance to my friends who hate Doctor Who but this face is my reaction to life & also I just CANNOT with this Buzzcocks, ugh.

Athens Is Ready for Its Close-up

"Thanks to a generous state tax credit—20 percent, plus an additional 10 percent if a production includes the Georgia logo and a link to the state’s film office—the state is seeing an explosion of film production. This tax credit is cited not only by economic development professionals, but also by local filmmakers who have seen more work come to the state in general. 

"Last year alone saw 142 feature film and television projects take place in Georgia, contributing $940 million in direct spending, according to Emily Murray of the Georgia Film, Music and Digital Entertainment Office"

I get that this is “good for the local economy” or whatever but attn: Marie, can we make t-shirts that say “DO NOT FILM” because today I had to sneak through the grocery store all wrapped up in my hoodie so that I wouldn’t accidentally be on Party Down South :/

"Two on, two out, two and two, bottom of the 9th — god, I’m gonna shit my pants. Did I say that already?"

Braves at Mets

I have phases of getting obsessed with dude bands that could easily be totally obnoxious especially when played incessantly (choice groups over the past coupla years include mclusky/future of the left, the White Stripes, the Black Keys, Quintron, the Dandy Warhols) but it’s okay because p. is really into the Beatles.

4 notes

Pain & Wonder (Matty Goldstein)
Athens GA, 04.17.14 | selenographie

Today I turned 30 and made a Responsible Adult Decision (FTFY).

STET is a Latin word (meaning “let it stand”). It is used by proofreaders and editors to instruct the typesetter or writer to disregard a change the editor or proofreader had previously marked.” (via Wiki)

katydidnot:

my family violence textbook says that restorative justice is not popularly used in family violence cases (including, of course, intimate partner violence) because of the following potential problems: “(1) victim safety, (2) manipulating by offenders, (3) pressure on victims, (4) community norms supportive of victim blaming, (5) mixed loyalties between participants, particularly family members and friends, (6) potential for minimal impact on offenders, and (7) offenders may not get the message that violence is wrong” (daly and stubbs 2006:17 in paine and gainey 2009). 

literally someone should make punx read this textbook before they write zines about accountability processes 

sorry but aren’t punx too busy being all "why is no one talking about this?!" to like consult a ~mainstream~ textbook for actual information

for Aria re: baby names

I’m not an legal expert by any means and there may be different laws in other states, but at least as far as Georgia is concerned I have these two anecdotes:

When my daughter was born I named her (sort of on principle; I knew that her adoptive parents were giving her a different name [which I was equally happy with]) and I was concerned because I was going to give her four names (first, middle, her father’s surname, then my surname) and I didn’t know if that would be allowed. While I was filling out the paperwork an attending nurse told me, “you could name a baby yabba-dabba-doo if you wanted to, it don’t matter!”

Also, interestingly, if the mother and father are unmarried, the father of the child is legally referred to “the biological father who is not the legal father.” If the mother of the child is married to a man who was not the biological father of the child, that man is “the legal father” regardless of his actual involvement with the mother or child. Hmm. I don’t feel well-versed in anything enough to have an opinion about this kinda loophole other than problematic.